About this book

     

As the father of three kids aged 20, 24, and 26, I've had plenty of experience with teenagers. Thankfully all three of our kids are accomplished, confident, and happy. Unfortunately, many other kids I've encountered are not doing as well. I've thought about the reasons for this a lot, noted what we did with our kids that worked, as well as what didn't, and captured that information in this book to hopefully help other teenagers be more happy and fulfilled.

As the title infers, this book is aimed at helping teenagers understand they don't know everything yet even though they may feel they do. The challenge is to convince them that this difference between what they think they know and what they actually know can cause them to make some bad, life-altering choices that they'll really regret. It's very hard for anyone to change their behavior merely as a result of something they've been told, no matter how much sense it makes. Unfortunately, most people only learn to change through bad experience, and some, not even then. This book attempts to counteract that tendency.

"What Every Teenager Should Know," is insightful, and its style is conversational, irreverent, and direct. Its intent is to speak to teenagers in a way that will get them to at least think about the consequences of their actions before acting, and thus avoid some serious regrets.

The main points of each chapter are summarized in tear out pages that can be put up on a wall, refrigerator, bathroom mirror, etc., to aid in understanding and recall and ultimately in changing behavior. 

Even though this book is full of humor, its target purpose is deadly serious: get teenagers to clearly understand that there's a lot that they still don't know, that some of their less well-informed choices could have life-long negative impacts, and that they need to think before acting.

Feel free to delve further into this book by perusing the sample chapters. If you like what you read, you can buy it after it's published, in early 2014.

Please email the author with any questions or comments at bobwasserman@aol.com.